To support the common good

Our communities contain multitudes. When we work together, we are resilient.

By LAURIE STUART
Posted 12/7/21

Over the river and through the woods, communities are stepping out with holiday events.

Perhaps it is the excitement to gather together in spirit following more than a year’s worth of living …

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To support the common good

Our communities contain multitudes. When we work together, we are resilient.

Posted

Over the river and through the woods, communities are stepping out with holiday events.

Perhaps it is the excitement to gather together in spirit following more than a year’s worth of living in the midst of a pandemic. Perhaps all that pent-up energy from last year’s event cancellation has fueled this super-energy expression of holiday goodness. Perhaps we’ve all been subdued with a low-grade malaise, struggling with constant stress or fears of a future unknown, given the climate, the pandemic, racial divides, the fractures in our national political landscape.

Whatever the reason, the streets are alive with vibrant decorations, horse-drawn carriages, apple cider and hot chocolate, visits with Santa, and shop-owners and shoppers all eager and excited for the holiday season.

That excitement is reflected in the multitude of communities who are pulling together to create accessible, family-centered joyful holiday activities. That excitement is reflected in the multitude of community residents who are coming to these events.

This energy holds a certain joy and comfort that, even in the midst of a pandemic, our communities are figuring out how to be safe and how to celebrate together as we maneuver in a landscape complete with a virulent communicative virus. This energy holds a parent’s hope that creating memories and connections for children and ourselves will ground us in this place we call our hometown.

It’s a yeoman’s job, and one that makes real the concept of “it takes a village.”

It takes a village, or a group of dedicated volunteers, to showcase and nurture community in these spectacular ways. And it’s not just one group. There are multitudes.

Take a look at the Where & When events calendar, in print and online, and marvel. There you will find holiday festivals, Christmas tree lightings, toy drives, food drives, clothing drives, library events, youth groups, theater groups. Contemplate the number of people, residents and neighbors who are choosing to support the common good in bringing these events and gatherings to fruition. (Then you might contemplate joining one of these groups and deepening your sense of belonging in the community.)

These events—and the memories and the connections they create—are a respite from the apathy and self-interest that plagues our world in this moment.

Thank you to all those volunteers who show us, model for us, and provide us with an experience of community that is joyful, accessible to all, and holds at its core the care that we have for each other.

The Upper Delaware River Valley is an amazing place to live. We celebrate all who make this so.

Upper Delaware River Valley, community, holiday activities, pandemic

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