News from town boards across Sullivan County

By LIAM MAYO
Posted 7/21/21

RIVER VALLEY — Last week was a busy one for Sullivan County town boards, with meetings and with public hearings in towns throughout the River Valley. Here’s a selection of news from the meetings in the towns of Callicoon, Tusten and Cochecton. 

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

News from town boards across Sullivan County

Posted

RIVER VALLEY — Last week was a busy one for Sullivan County town boards, with meetings and with public hearings in towns throughout the River Valley. Here’s a selection of news from the meetings in the towns of Callicoon, Tusten and Cochecton. 

Callicoon

The Callicoon Town Board met Monday, July 12, with a pair of public hearings in addition to the board’s regular business.

The first public hearing discussed infrastructure plans within the Youngsville Water District. The district’s water tower is approaching 90 years old and is in need of repair or replacement.

The town had applied in March for a delayed 2020 round of funding from the Small Cities Program to the tune of just under a million dollars. While it had been denied for that round, the board’s consultant suggested that it apply again for the 2021 round of funding; this the board agreed to do.

(For details on the other public hearing, about a proposed new law regulating renewable energy in Callicoon, see this week’s story on solar in Callicoon and Bethel on page 1.)

In other business, the board presented the town’s Senior Citizen of the Year award to John Goodfriend. Goodfriend operates Dependable Medical Transportation, a service that drives people without easy access to transportation to doctors’ appointments and other medical necessities.

“I am so inspired by this gentleman,” said town supervisor Tom Bose. “What he does for people when they’re really down and out... he does it for them.”

Tusten

The Tusten Town Board, meeting on Tuesday, July 13, discussed movement within the town’s zoning board of appeals (ZBA).

One member, Stephen J. Weston Jr., is resigning from the board, with an alternate member, Stephen Stuart, moving to the board to replace him.

The town voted to approve the move, with three votes in favor and one abstention.

The search now begins for another alternate member for the ZBA; a Tusten resident in attendance expressed interest, and while supervisor Ben Johnson said he prefers to start people on the planning board and move them to the ZBA once they’ve acquired some experience, he said that was not a prerequisite.

The board also discussed applying for a Technical Assistance Grant (TAG) from the Upper Delaware Council.

Town councilwoman Jane Luchsinger suggested using the funds from the grant to revise the town’s zoning code, as well as to print a leaflet explaining to new homeowners who to contact to check that they were following proper zoning regulations.

A member of the public asked about the current status of zoning revisions and how long they would take to complete.

“I don’t see why they can’t be done in less than a year,” said Johnson.

The motion to apply for the TAG passed.

Cochecton

Discussion at the Cochecton Town Board meeting on Wednesday, July 14 centered on issues of public safety.

Peter Grosser spoke to the board about the issues facing the Cochecton Volunteer Ambulance Corps. The corps was not receiving enough money from patient insurance, he said, and the state’s refusal to categorize the ambulance corps as an essential emergency service left it ineligible for grant funding.

He asked the board whether the town could fund the organization.

The town funding the corps could leave it open to liability in lawsuits, said town attorney Karen Mannino. And there may not be a legal way to fund the organization as it is currently structured.

But the board said it would consider the matter. “We’ll do everything legally and try to get you guys some money,” said town councilmember Dr. Paul Salzberg.

The board also discussed putting speed limit signs along Shortcut Road.

Since its paving, cars have been driving at dangerous speeds down Shortcut Road. Members of the board asked if the town could put speed limit signs along that stretch of road.

It wasn’t that easy, said supervisor Gary Maas. They would need to pay the county to survey the road—a survey that could get expensive. And once surveyed, it was out of the town’s hands what limit the country would decide to put on the road.

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here