Looking Back


Photo provided by the Wayne County Historical Society
Benjamin Haines

Courthouse war: Part two

Construction of the new Wayne County Courthouse began quickly. By the end of 1876, the foundation was complete and $30,000 had been spent. At this point, opposition to the new courthouse threatened the project. Concerns were raised about the need for bond issues, increased taxes and future costs, and rumor added fuel to the fire.


Photo provided by the Basket Historical Society
 

Looking Back

There are two species of poisonous snakes in the Catskills: the northern copperhead and the timber rattlesnake. During this season, these snakes are coming out of hibernation.


Photo provided by the Wayne County Historical Society
 

Courthouse war: Part one

To the dismay of the citizens of Bethany, the original county seat, Honesdale became the county seat of Wayne County in 1841. By 1843, a new courthouse had been built in the borough. However, within 30 years, judges and grand juries had declared the courthouse too small, badly ventilated and altogether unsatisfactory.


Photo provided by the Basket Historical Society
 

Looking Back

Wild leeks, or ramps, are a forager’s delicacy in Upstate New York, and spring is the prime season for these onion-like bulbs.

Ramps are most commonly found in the moist woodlands of the Northeast. The plants prefer to grow away from direct sunlight on north-facing slopes; they are unfazed by the cold temperatures in the shade.


Photo provided by the Wayne County Historical Society
Butternut Creek Bridge, Sterling Township

Looking Back

In 1798, five townships—Buckingham, Canaan, Damascus, Mount Pleasant and Palmyra—became the new Wayne County. Salem Township was formed from Canaan, and Sterling township was split off from Salem in 1815. The new township initially included present-day Dreher and Lehigh Townships. Capt.


Photo provided by the Basket Historical Society
The Delaware River from the top of Jensen’s Ledges, Long Eddy, spring 2013.

Looking Back

Earth Day 2019 is April 22. Whether you plan to participate in a community-wide litter pluck or simply implement using a reusable water bottle in place of a plastic one, it is a day to honor and celebrate the environment.


Photo provided by the Wayne County Historical Society
 

Looking Back

Although Philip Hone became a symbol of upper class New York City, his life began in 1780 as the younger son of a poor carpenter. At the age of 16, he joined his brother’s auctioneering business. By the time he was 35, it had made him a very wealthy man, enabling him to retire at the age of 41.


Photo provided by the Basket Historical Society
John Snavely, left, and Charles Clark, with Billie Clark in the window, on opening day April 1, 1935. The note on the photo says “freezing.” The buttons on the men’s hats are their NY State fishing licenses.

Looking Back

Federal fishing regulations have existed since the 1800s, and unofficial protections date back even further to the Colonial Era, when European settlers set catch limits and gear limits for spawning periods.


Photo provided by the Wayne County Historical Society
This stone house South of Hamlin on Route 191, built in 1801, received a Historic Preservation Award from the Wayne County Historical Society in 2008.

From Salem Corners to Hamlin

Salem Township was formed in 1808 from one of the original townships of Wayne County, Canaan.


Photos contributed by the Basket Historical Society
Stamp booklet for customers of Henry Doyle’s general store in Long Eddy from the mid-1900s.

Rewarding customers in the mid-1900s

Today, we have rewards cards and online point-systems when we shop, but in the late-19th and early-20th centuries, stores used trading stamps as an incentive to become a repeat customer.

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