river talk

Winter eagle viewing in 2021

By SCOTT RANDO
Posted 1/13/21

Bald eagles in Canada have been making their migration trip south to areas with open water in order to dine on their favorite food, fish.

The Delaware and Mongaup river systems, along with …

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river talk

Winter eagle viewing in 2021

Posted

Bald eagles in Canada have been making their migration trip south to areas with open water in order to dine on their favorite food, fish.

The Delaware and Mongaup river systems, along with surrounding tributaries, sustain a good population of wintering eagles, as there is ample room for foraging opportunities in open, ice-free water. A few golden eagles also come to the region for easier foraging opportunities. Golden eagles do not breed here, but a few can be seen throughout the winter.

If you go out on eagle trips this winter, you may notice changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Delaware Highlands Conservancy (DHC) announced that they will not have volunteer staff at any of the blinds or at the Zane Gray access area, and DHC guided eagle-watch bus trips have been canceled. They warn that some blinds may be closed, and snow removal from these areas may not occur in a timely manner. If the blind is closed, you can still park and observe eagles from your vehicle.

Speaking of cars, your car makes a nice blind, and eagles are likely to come closer than if there are people walking around. Taking a tour with your social bubble is a safe activity; there are many places along the Delaware and Lackawaxen where eagles have been spotted in numbers. There was a report from the Lackawaxen that stated dead alewives, small fish, were spotted near the bank. When the power plant at the Wallenpaupack Dam is operating, many of these fish get stunned or killed by the turbine blades. This attracts the eagles.

There are many places in the region to spot eagles this winter. For more information, visit www.delawarehighlands.org/eagles.

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