Raking leaves isn’t necessary and more

Letters to the editor, November 18 to 24

Posted 11/16/21

Electoral process won in Highland

As an observer living in the next town over, I think that turnout in Highland was magnificent—729 voters—and that the town had two candidates vying …

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Raking leaves isn’t necessary and more

Letters to the editor, November 18 to 24

Posted

Electoral process won in Highland

As an observer living in the next town over, I think that turnout in Highland was magnificent—729 voters—and that the town had two candidates vying for one very important job to lead for the next two years.

Unfortunately, that cannot be said for my town, Tusten, or in Cochecton, where there was no choice for the people to make for the supervisor position. In many years when there is no contest, the turnout is half that amount.

Having candidates that have no political opposition, in my opinion, shortchanges the electorate regarding policy and future legislation as well the overall process.

Going into any political contest, candidates know beforehand that there will be a winner and a loser when the dust settles, but to this observer, it was your town, as well our electoral process, that won big with that turnout in Highland.

Tony Ritter

Narrowsburg, NY

Raking leaves isn’t necessary

Tired of raking? You don’t have to. Raking is so 1990s! Leaving the leaves provides shelter and food for moths, bees, snails, spiders, butterflies and beetles. Most of these do not migrate. Your home is their home and, like us, they need cover against wintry elements… as well as predators.

Swallowtail butterflies are camouflaged in chrysalises that resemble dry leaves or a stick. The red-banded hairstreak butterfly deposits eggs on fallen oak leaves, which in turn are the food for the emerging caterpillars. Leaves keep the soil soft enough for a queen bee to crawl into and hibernate.

Don’t want to leave leaves all over the place? Okay, then gather them around trees, spread them over flower gardens, let them pile up in corners and let a thin layer remain on the turf. All of this helps wildlife and diminishes weeds.

For more information on leaves go to: https://www.leaveleavesalone.org/.

Doris Chorny

Wallkill, NY

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