Outdoors


Photo from Pixabay

Early season trout fishing

April 1, opening of trout season in New York State, arrived in my neighborhood with bright sunshine, a stiff wind and a reading of 21 degrees on the thermometer. A little later that morning, I spoke with a friend who lives near Roscoe who said, “It’s snowing.” When I asked if he was going fishing, he laughed.


TRR photos by Scott Rando

One of the frogs, which was likely feeling the effects of its recent emergence, is seen sitting on the ice for a period of time. Amphibians become somewhat torpid at very low temperatures, making them very vulnerable to predation, but I did not see any attempts by crows or other birds.

Frogs on ice

This time of the year I get into the habit of checking for the first signs and sounds of the spring peepers and wood frogs in local ponds. In our region, the last week of March through the first week of April is a great time to hear those first emerging for the season.


Photo from Pixabay

Little brooks

This morning was the first morning I heard a robin’s song. Many months have passed since the robins last sang; it was a cloudy morning with a warm rain, the perfect time to go fishing. The beginning of that day was like so many other days that I recall so vividly from years ago.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

Lighten your spirits with a good laugh at the creatures we share our lives with—even those who, at times, test our patience!
 

A dose of delight

By the time this column goes to press, the few lingering lumps of crusty snow-ice in my yard will hopefully have seeped into the soggy earth. The transition from winter’s slow fade to spring’s invigorating rise sometimes


TRR photos by Scott Rando

Spring peepers can be heard in wetlands and ponds and may be seen nearby on grass or roads. Their scientific name, Pseudacris crucifer, describes the cross pattern on the spring peeper’s back. Where one spring peeper is heard, you will hear many more. Male spring peepers call for several weeks during the breeding season.

Amphibians on the move

Over the past few weeks, you may have seen notices in social media and newspapers (including The River Reporter) regarding certain roads being closed down some nights in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation


TRR photo by Sandy Long
Switch off your lights in honor of Earth Hour on March 30, beginning at 8:30 p.m. Plan an appropriate activity highlighting this year’s focus—the biodiversity of life on Earth. Pen a poem or write a letter to the mighty Delaware River or your favorite animal or plant species.  Afterwards, share it through social media or send it to your local newspaper for possible publication to raise awareness of the tremendous natural resources that sustain our lives here.
 

An hour for the Earth

In an effort to inspire people around the world to take action in support of the planet and the natural world, a grassroots movement known as Earth Hour was launched in 2007.


Photo provided by Wikipedia Commons
Ariel view of the Amawalk Outlet, to the left of the cloud.
 

Amawalk revisited

As fly fishers, we all have favorite rivers. Sometimes, one or more of those rivers plays a significant role in our lives, a role that isn’t evident in the first years. For me, that river was Amawalk Outlet.

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