Locals think national at midterm polls

“The environment is a large issue for me, and just like this really, I don’t know, uneasy, horrible feeling that I think we all have..."

REGION — The Republican Victory Center on Honesdale’s Main St. was still laid out in full campaign mode Monday afternoon, as a cardboard cutout of President Donald Trump looked out over tables of stickers for Republicans John Chrin and Scott Wagner, a coffee station and an empty room.

The only two volunteers left at 4:30 p.m. were Kathy Martin and Jennifer O’Reilly—both serving their first year as volunteers at the victory center. The campaigning was done, the poll watchers had been assigned, the phone calls had been made. Work on the 2018 midterm elections was coming to a close.

Down the street, the spacious Democratic Headquarters had already closed up for the night. All that was left to do was wait and see who turned out to vote.

As the rain fell on Tuesday, voters just across the border headed to the polls in steady numbers. Even smaller polling places, like the Town of Callicoon Senior Center, were already reaching 100 before 10:15 a.m. It seemed that, as predicted, turnout in New York was going to be higher than average and revolve largely around polarizing federal politics.

At the Livingston Manor Fire Department, 176 people had showed up by 10:30 a.m. “We’ve had more people as of this hour than we’ve had before,” an election official said there. Many of the people who turned out for this election, like 33-year-old Erin Lindsey, had the country on their minds as they filled out their ballots.

“The environment is a large issue for me, and just like this really, I don’t know, uneasy, horrible feeling that I think we all have about the things that Trump has enabled,” she said. Lindsey moved to Livingston Manor three years ago from Brooklyn, right after 55% of the county voted for President Trump. “It’s a little bit of a shock for me... I don’t have any ill will toward anyone; I think we can all get along, just finding those commonalities… and just being kind, above all.”

Trump has campaigned significantly across his home state. His endorsements, especially in the precarious 19th Congressional race between Anthony Delgado and incumbent John Faso, have been key for voters here.

Al Smith, voting in Narrowsburg on Tuesday, said he’s voting this year to keep the country moving in what he considers a positive direction economically under the current federal government. “I wanted to make sure that the economy continues to grow. I’m very happy in the way the country’s going,” he said. “I don’t recall hearing anything from a local politician about what they’re going to do for the economy. So I can’t really say that was the concern; the focus was the nation.”

“I don’t recall hearing anything from a local politician about what they’re going to do for the economy. So I can’t really say that was the concern; the focus was the nation.”

Election official Charles Blanchard said that the Town of Tusten Town Hall received more ballots than usual this year. By 12 noon, 226 of 1,028 registered voters in the town had showed up to cast their votes.

Narrowsburg resident Karen Morris was one of those voters, casting her ballot with the recent judicial hearing of Brett Kavanaugh in mind. “I feel that we have to really put a human voice back into government. It’s such an abomination… And it’s a very emotionally charged process for me,” she said, donning her shiny “I Voted” sticker proudly. “I feel that it’s more important [now] that I vote. That my vote really does count now for something important. To save healthcare. To save concern for working people.”]
 

 

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