Columns

Scout on the rails

Bang! Boom! Smash! The loud racket at the front of the train car broke the tranquility of my staring peacefully out the window. It seemed that one of the duffel bags had rolled off the overhead rack, landing on the head of its owner and his three companions.


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

Monticello’s  YO1 Luxury Nature Cure destination boasts stunning interiors as well as gorgeous vistas. This “living wall” is fed by mist, and is featured in one of the many common areas throughout the expansive retreat

How do you spell relief?

First name Amanda, last name Reed. And boy oh boy, do I owe her one.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

I chanced upon this encounter between an earthworm, at left, and a slug while walking on a dirt road. Both species exhibited considerable interest in the other. Some slugs consume earthworms. Both are hermaphrodites, meaning that each individual carries male and female reproductive organs. Neither is harmful to humans.

Slug season

Summer officially arrived on June 21, heralding the return of some critters we might prefer not to share our lives and regional landscape with.


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

Liane Zielinski, left, and Rebecca Simon were two of the larger-than-life “Steel Magnolias” on stage last week at the Forestburgh Playhouse, but alas... they’re already gone.

Mad dogs and Englishmen…

Today’s title above is a somewhat esoteric reference to an old Noel Coward song that I’m fairly sure is no longer considered PC—so I won’t include any of the lyrics here (“Use the Google!” as Mom would yell); suffice it to say that the song refers to blistering heat, which caused the mercury to rise in the Upper Delaware River region over the la


TRR photos by Scott Rando

This is the female young which is a few days short of three weeks old. Like many raptors, the peregrine falcon is sexually dimorphic; the female is slightly larger than the male on average. Even in this brood, this female was slightly heavier than its male sibling: 610 grams vs. 420 grams. The ear orifice can be seen to the lower left of the eye.

Peregrine falcons return to historical cliff nest site

When we think of peregrine falcons nowadays, we think of them nesting on high building ledges and bridge superstructures in urban areas.


file image

A night with brown drakes

My friend called this morning to see if I was loose to go fishing. He said the flows had dropped significantly, and the river was fishable for the first time in weeks. We talked and set a time to meet. On the way he asked where I wanted to fish. I said, “How about that section on the lower river, where we just obtained permission?


TRR photos by Jonathan Fox

Roger Daltrey wowed the crowd at Bethel Woods with a tribute to “Tommy.”

Puppet shows, plays and parades

Even though I maintain that the “Three Ps” are my bread and butter, I’m not really complaining (go figure), but rather attempting to encapsulate what would otherwise be a very lengthy explanation of what I do for those who dare to inquire.

The best and the worst

Some famous words come to mind as I follow ongoing research and policy relating to climate change: “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of light, it was the season of darkness, it was the spring

Pages

 

Privacy Policy & Terms of Use

Copyright 2018 Stuart Communications, Inc.

PO Box 150, 93 Erie Avenue

Narrowsburg NY 12764

(845) 252-7414

All Rights Reserved