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To market! To market!

GREG TRIGGS
Posted 5/1/19

Often on a Saturday I would find myself at home, bored, munching on a celery stick and wishing there was somewhere, anywhere to go for a walk amongst neighbors and like-minded people. I longed to …

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To market! To market!

Posted

Often on a Saturday I would find myself at home, bored, munching on a celery stick and wishing there was somewhere, anywhere to go for a walk amongst neighbors and like-minded people. I longed to peruse artisanal cheeses, fresh pastas, quail eggs and freshly baked breads in the brisk spring air. Ideally, this imagined mecca would be a short walk or drive away.

No respite in sight, the future looked bleak.

Then everything changed.

Fans of locally sourced farm-fresh produce and products will be thrilled to know the Narrowsburg Farmers’ Market will be back in business soon. On Saturdays, starting May 18 and running through the end of October, the market will be open from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Narrowsburg Union. Thirteen confirmed vendors will be set up, ready to sell, come rain or come shine.

Participants in the Narrowsburg Farmers’ Market will include Willow Wisp Organic Farm, Trapani Farms and CSA, Hilly Acres Farm, Quails R-US Plus, Channery Hill Farm, Eminence Road Farm Winery, The Cidery, Myrtle Avenue Bakehouse, Cakes & Scones Bakery, Northern Farmhouse Pasta, Mo’s Tonic, Bill Walsh Oakworks and Jam Thyme.

Be sure to check back weekly, as organizers hope to add more vendors and hold fun special events for the whole family throughout the season.

There are many reasons for locals and weekenders to support the new farmers’ market. They can have significant impact on a community. According to online estimates, these markets generate almost two billion dollars in annual sales. Those are monies that almost entirely stay and are reinvested in the community sponsoring the market. The foot traffic can be a boon to all businesses within a town or village as well. Often, markets inspire new visitors—customers that will stay for a meal and shop at other stores during their day trip.

Part of a proud tradition, the markets started in the United States 1634 in Boston; although history tells us the very first farmers’ market probably started in Egypt over 5,000 years ago.

Regular updates of the modern variety can be found on Facebook by joining the event group Narrowsburg Farmers’ Market or by visiting, www.bit.ly/NBmarket.

Scones for everyone! See you at the Narrowsburg Farmers’ Market starting on May 18.

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