Special honorees

By Z. A. KOHLOA
Posted 1/5/22

DAMASCUS, PA — On December 20, 2021, William “Bill” Adams was the honorary guest at the Damascus Board of Supervisors meeting. Adams, who is over 90 years old, is a long-time …

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Special honorees

William (Bill) Adams, center, is flanked with this certificates and plaques for his 25 years of service to the Damascus Township Planning Board. To his left, supervisor Joseph Canfield holds one of the plaques, while Tony Herzog, representing Senator Lisa Baker's office, is to the right. Daniel Rutledge, back row, and supervisor Steve Adams pose for the moment.
William (Bill) Adams, center, is flanked with this certificates and plaques for his 25 years of service to the Damascus Township Planning Board. To his left, supervisor Joseph Canfield holds one of the plaques, while Tony Herzog, representing Senator Lisa Baker's office, is to the right. Daniel Rutledge, back row, and supervisor Steve Adams pose for the moment.
RR photo by ZA Kolhoa
Posted

DAMASCUS, PA — On December 20, 2021, William “Bill” Adams was the honorary guest at the Damascus Board of Supervisors meeting. Adams, who is over 90 years old, is a long-time resident of Damascus Township. The board members were honoring him for his 25 years of service on the planning commission.

In presenting Adams with a plaque, chairman Joseph Canfield said, “Bill has done a very good job over the years as the planning commissioner. He’s helped the township go in a conservative direction and stay a local town without the town getting too big.”

“Senator Lisa Baker prepared a certificate of recognition to honor you, William Adams, for your 25 years of dedicated service to the Damascus Township,” said Tony Herzog, a representative from Baker’s office.

Adams both arrived at and left the Damascus board meeting with a winsome smile. He accepted his plaque and certificate with obvious gratitude, stood proud for pictures and later joked about his hearing as he tried to hear the board meeting procedures.  

The board members also presented a plaque to Daniel Rutledge for his work as vice-chairman on the board of supervisors. That night’s meeting was Rutledge’s last scheduled public board meeting.

Canfield thanked Rutledge for his service to the board. “Dan, you contributed a lot to this township and we really learned a lot from you,” Canfield and supervisor Steve Adams both said.

In the near future, Rutledge may stay involved with the park project, which is still in Phase One. He may also continue his involvement in the grant-writing process for acquiring funding for the park project.

Herzog also presented Rutledge with a certificate of recognition from Baker, honoring him for his time on the board.

Scott Rutledge, who ran unopposed, will replace Daniel Rutledge as the new vice-chairman.

Zoning officer Ed Lagarenne reminded everyone that campaign signs have to be removed seven days after an election. This year, November 9 was that date. Lagarenne pointed out that many residents in the township still have signs in their yards, even though it was a month and a half later at the time of the board meeting.

Lagarenne explained that a campaign is a temporary event. During that time, a certain number of permits are given out at no cost for campaign signs to be displayed. However, an ordinance is now in place that makes the display of campaign signs illegal after seven days.

“It has already been a year past the 2020 election and signs are still visible on people’s lawns,” Lagarenne said. “If you want to hang a sign on your house, or fence, or glue it to your car, that’s fine. However, it can’t continue to be a yard sign. I get the sentiment, but if those temporary signs are still there when the snow hits, I will have to enforce the law.”

Lagarenne advised community members to keep children informed of good safety practices during the winter season. Those procedures include practicing safe sled-riding, learning how to operate snow machines and four-wheelers safely, and being aware of the temperature before walking on frozen lakes.

Lagarenne advised community members to keep four-wheelers off of roads. “It’s not safe and four-wheelers don’t belong on the road. The slush and ice makes it even more dangerous for accidents by cars due to poor visibility. At times a car coming down the road might not be able to avoid hitting a four-wheeler. Take precaution to prevent unnecessary accidents.”

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