Rabbits are amazing pets

There are so many benefits to being a bunny-parent

By ANNEMARIE SCHUETZ and VERONICA DAUB
Posted 6/10/20

As we humans face a pandemic of our own, the world’s rabbits face a similar danger (read about Rabbit Hemorrhagic Virus here). A slim saving grace, rabbits kept inside homes have a lower risk …

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Rabbits are amazing pets

There are so many benefits to being a bunny-parent

Posted

As we humans face a pandemic of our own, the world’s rabbits face a similar danger (read about Rabbit Hemorrhagic Virus here). A slim saving grace, rabbits kept inside homes have a lower risk of contracting the virus. It’s unlikely we have to convince you of the obvious truth about these adorable floofs, but we’d like to make the case for keeping rabbits as pets.

Take it from Becca Coombe, local rabbit lover and 4-H member for 12 years, eight of which includes involvement in the rabbit program: “I have Dutch, Polish, Cinnamon, Californian and Holland Lop rabbits; all my rabbits are special because each has its own personality. I love getting to teach people about my rabbits and having the ability to bring joy to other people with my animals. I have introduced my rabbits to people all across Sullivan County at schools and libraries, allowing them to experience the joy of animals. I have also made friends all across the country from showing; even though we can’t see each other all the time, we still have the rabbits in common.”

Soft and fluffy, gentle and quiet, rabbits are one of the most popular small pets in America. According to the American Pet Products Association survey, there were 6.6 million of them in 2010.

It’s understandable. Bunnies are easy to please; they’ll play with simple toys like toilet paper rolls.

They’re also easy to train. If you can’t invite a dog or cat into your home, rabbits might be the replacement for you. Considering you can train them to use a litter box, you can choose to let them roam free around a house just as a dog or cat would.

 If you’re allergic to dogs and cats but want a fluffy friend in your life, the rex breed might be the best pick for you. They have a low shed count with little dander, making them a great choice, says Allergy & Air. (Allergy-sufferers: as a general rule of thumb, stay away from long-haried rabbits.)

Rabbits are awake when you are and most active in the mornings and evenings—no staying up all night listening to your hamster run in its wheel. Actually, they’re one of the quietest housepets you can find, and they actually perfer the calm and quiet. Rabbits can make great pets for older children, but one might not thrive in a choatic household full of younger kids. Rabbits are also known for their fragile bone structure and can be seriously injured due to mishandling—another reason to let your kids grow up a bit before introducing a bunny-friend into your home. Take it from Petfinder: “Children are naturally loving. However, ‘loving’ to a small child often means holding, cuddling and carrying an animal around—behaviors that make most rabbits feel insecure and frightened, as they would in the grasp of a predator. When mishandled, rabbits who scratch or bite to protect themselves are often surrendered to shelters, where they may be euthanized for ‘bad behavior.’”

Vetstreet.com lists a few other reasons: rabbits are loaded with personality, they bond easily with their owners, are clean and don’t need much room (and don’t have to be walked!). Plus, they live eight to twelve years, so if you adopt a bunny you’ll have a friend for a long time.

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