Night lights kill!

Letter to the editor, March 17 to 23

Posted 3/16/22

Night lights kill!

We are aware that moths are fatally attracted to light, though no one understands just why. Moths can literally burn themselves out as they careen around an artificial light or …

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Night lights kill!

Letter to the editor, March 17 to 23

Posted

Night lights kill!

We are aware that moths are fatally attracted to light, though no one understands just why. Moths can literally burn themselves out as they careen around an artificial light or die by zooming onto a bulb. What we’re less aware of is that most moths dine on the nectar of nocturnal flowers. If these flowers are illuminated by artificial light, 62 percent less feeding occurs. These lights also make it harder for them to find a mate, but easier for birds, spiders and ants to find a meal of moths.

We should care about the size of the moth population because we care about the size of our bird population. A typical baby bird consumes 30 to 40 meals a day and caterpillars are the most nutritious and easily consumed meal for nestlings. If we decimate the moth population, we decimate the caterpillar population and we impact the life cycle of birds.

For the sake of your security, use yellow motion-detector lights that focus light downward instead. They now can be solar-generated so don’t require electricity. You’ll be securing many little but important lives at the same time.

Doris Chorny

Wallkill, NY

night lights, moths, birds, ecosystem

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