Kim's kitchen

Make this liberty eagle out of fondant

Perfect as a decorative topping for a cake or cookie

By KIM SIMONS
Posted 6/25/20

I have always loved birds—raptors, in particular. When I see a hawk in flight, I know I’m going to have a good day.

I have also always been proud of where I come from—Liberty, …

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Kim's kitchen

Make this liberty eagle out of fondant

Perfect as a decorative topping for a cake or cookie

Posted

I have always loved birds—raptors, in particular. When I see a hawk in flight, I know I’m going to have a good day.

I have also always been proud of where I come from—Liberty, NY. My high school graduating class is still very tight; we’ll get together for a big reunion as soon as COVID-19 allows.

Growing up, I spent a great deal of time at the Clarence Hoyt VFW Post. My father, Jack Simons, was a Liberty High School graduate and a wounded Korean War veteran who eventually became the VFW State Commander. He and my mother, Carol, instilled a sense of community volunteerism in me as well as a desire to do some good in the world... which I hope I’m doing through my artwork.

As the United States approaches its 244th birthday, it’s no secret that we’re facing tough times. But thinking about our local bald eagles might provide us with some insight and maybe even some hope.

According to the website “American Bald Eagle Information” (my husband loves to research these things), “The bald eagle was chosen June 20, 1782 as the emblem of the United States of America because of its long life, great strength and majestic looks, and also because it was then believed to exist only on this continent” (www.baldeagleinfo.com). True to the eventual American character, not everyone was on board. Benjamin Franklin, for example, thought the bald eagle was a terrible choice. “He does not get his living honestly,” Franklin wrote. “You may have seen him perched on some dead tree, where, too lazy to fish for himself, he watches the labor of the fishing-hawk, and when that diligent bird has at length taken a fish, and is bearing it to its nest for the support of his mate and young ones, the bald eagle pursues him and takes it from him” (www.baldeagleinfo.com). Franklin’s choice? The turkey.

For me, the bald eagle soaring over places like the Hawk’s Nest is majestic; I feel that they are pure spirits of strength and courage. We might also consider how farsighted and intelligent they are—qualities we need to hang on to today.

For these reasons, I chose to name this piece the Liberty Eagle. I hope you have fun making it!

Cover cake, cookie... extra with white fondant 

Roll out the field with navy blue fondant; it will be about 5” x 5”...attach to the top lefthand side of the piece

Roll the stripes of red fondant; you will need three 1 1/4-inch thick x 9” long. Using a little water, attach, alternating with the white background.

Roll white fondant for the stars; you will need about seven 1/2” stars. Using a little water, attach alternating the rows.

Roll white fondant and cut out the head of the eagle about 6” x 6” using an X-Acto blade. Use a little water; attach in the middle of the piece.

Roll a 1-inch ball of yellow for the eye; using a little water, add on.

Roll yellow fondant and cut out the beak of the eagle about 2” x 4 using an X-Acto blade. Use a little water to attach.

Add texture to the head by rolling strips and attach, using a little water to show the flowing features.

Using a clay tool, blend and add more texture to the head and beak.

Using flack fondant, roll a very small ball and flatten; add a little water to the center of the eye and attach.

Using edible colors, add shadow and highlights to the head, the beak, and around the eye.

Using a very teeny amount of white fondant, add highlights and dust with edible paint.

Kim Simons is an artist, cake artist and food artist. She and her team—the Bah Hum Bakers—are the reigning champs of Food Network’s “Holiday Wars.” Kim’s gluten-free cookbook, “Get All Cook-Y With Kim,” is available on Amazon. Visit Kim at www.cakesbykimsimons.com.

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