Outdoors


TRR photos by Scott Rando

These cubs, about three months old, need to be kept warm during their processing, so there are usually a few extra people along on the Pennsylvania Game Commission (PGC) den surveys to act as “cub warmers.” These cubs, which weighed about five to eight pounds. are growing as they nurse from their mother. Mom, however, loses about 30% of her body mass during the hibernation.

Counting cubs in PA

During the third week of March, I was fortunate enough to be invited to a PA bear survey in Pike and Monroe Counties. Every year around mid-March, the PA Game Commission (PGC) surveys known bear dens and checks on the litter of young cubs that were born in January. By mid-March, the cubs are big enough to process.

A two-foot Tigger pole

It was orange, tiny and terrifying in the hands of a kid. Something about giving a five-year-old a pointy stick with a metal hook on it made me think twice. Still, she had it and was having the time of her life with it. She picked the pole out at the store by herself. “It’s Tigger, t-i-double-guh-er.”


TRR photos by Sandy Long

Pike and Wayne counties are blessed with abundant and beautiful waterways like the Lackawaxen River, which was named River of the Year in 2010 by the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR). The annual recognition raises awareness of the important recreational, ecological and historical resources associated with the state’s rivers and streams and underscores the importance of maintaining healthy waterways.

Water wellness awareness

According to the Foundation for Pennsylvania Wetlands, the Keystone state has more miles of streams and rivers than any other state except Alaska. Those waterways are of prime importance to the human and non-human lives that depend upon them.


TRR photos by Scott Rando

This is an aerial shot of the west shore of Walker Lake in Shohola, PA that was taken on the morning after the March 5 storm. Most of the trees in this image are white pine, and most of them have a significant amount of snow on them.

March roars in like a lion

Hopefully, by the time you read this, it will not be by candlelight or the light from a Colman lantern. As of March 9, there are still a few spots on both sides of the river without power. On the 2nd of March, a heavy, wet snowstorm hit; this caused trees to come down across power lines and even a few houses were damaged by fallen trees.


Photo by Martha Tully

This photograph of the stone arch bridge over Ten Mile River near Narrowsburg, NY has won the Delaware River Basin Commission’s winter 2018 photo contest.

Photo contest winner hails from Glen Spey

WEST TRENTON, NJ — The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) has announced that Martha Tully’s “Winter at the Stone Arch Bridge” was chosen as the winner of the commission’s Winter 2018 Photo Contest.  Twenty-three photographs were submitted by 14 individuals for the contest.

DEP internships available

REGION — The New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) is encouraging college students to apply for one of 17 summer internships at its offices in the Hudson Valley and Catskill Mountains. These paid internships are in fields related to science and engineering.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

These tracks indicate the passage of a human and two dogs. But what is that curious arc appearing to the left of the first dog’s tracks? The human tracks are mine and the middle tracks, displaying a normal gait, were made by my dog Ziva. My new pup, Raven, has a waddling side-to-side swish. As her hind feet move forward, they swing outward, creating the crescent shape seen here. Domestic dogs provide good opportunities to hone your tracking skills.

Surviving the times

Severe weather events like the one that struck the Upper Delaware River region recently throw us suddenly out of our normal routines. Priorities shift to survival activities like securing adequate shelter, clean water and ample nourishment.

Reflections

It’s early March, soft snow falling, a fire in the wood stove. Molly is snoring at the hearth. It’s been an abnormally cold winter here in the Catskills, with below zero nights and brisk, windy days. There is a lot of snow too, much more than normal.

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