Outdoors


TRR photo by Jane Bollinger

The brown color patterns of ruffed grouse make them inconspicuous in their forest habitat and helps keep them from being detected by predators. Some good news has come from the PGC study; if a grouse comes into contact with West Nile virus and survives, it then develops antibodies which prevents them from contracting the disease in the future.

Trouble for the ruffed grouse in PA

Hunters in PA have always looked forward to going afield with a dog and pursuing the elusive ruffed grouse. You can hunt this species without a dog, but it is a lot more difficult, as these well camouflaged birds flush out of cover and provide the briefest of targets before they rapidly disappear in forest cover.


File photo

Sugar Shack Scramble, orienteering

DINGMANS FERRY, PA — Pocono Environmental Education Center (PEEC) will host Sugar Shack Scramble, a hike through the woods out to the Two Saps Sugar Shack, on Sunday, March 4 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. In addition to the hiking, you’ll enjoy hot cocoa and pancakes with fresh maple syrup. You can sign up for a 9 a.m. or 9:30 a.m. start time.


Photos courtesy of PA Dept. of Agriculture

Almost clownish in appearance, the spotted lanternfly is no laughing matter. This exotic insect poses a major threat to many of our region’s native plant species and hardwood forests. Adults are approximately 1 inch long and one-half inch wide at rest.

Meeting to target spotted lanternfly

As noted in our news story of February 8, the latest exotic insect invader to threaten our native plant species is the spotted lanternfly (SLF). Despite its eye-catching appearance, this is a seriously bad bug that was first discovered in Berks County, PA in 2014 and has expanded to affect approximately 3,000 square miles by the end of 2017.


TRR photos by Scott Rando

These yearling immature bald eagles were above the Lackawaxen confluence early in February. As is the case with the young of many species, the play instinct is strong. Many immature eagles display talons to each other, but it is mostly play; they are also honing skills they will need to survive.

Winter eagles and air shows

This is the time of year when ice is plentiful on the lakes and rivers, a central factor in explaining why we see so many bald eagles over-wintering in our region. During these cold months, many eagles migrate from northern New England and Canada to spend the winter here.


Contributed photo

Winter Ecology Hike at Lacawac

LAKE ARIEL, PA — How do plants and animals survive the cold? Take a short hike and breathe in the crisp winter air while finding signs of life in winter at the Lacawac Sanctuary, 94 Sanctuary Rd., on Saturday, February 24 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. The hike is free.

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