Outdoors


TRR photos by Scott Rando

In the mid-2000s, the National Park Service obtained funds to purchase and release galerucella beetles, pictured here. These leaf beetles are host-specific predators of purple loosestrife, an invasive plant that is displacing many native plant species in our region.

New York announces invasive species grants

It’s the middle of winter, and you’re probably not thinking now about  invasive species. Then again, it’s hard to forget clearing thickets of Japanese barberry or treating hemlocks for wooly adelgid, if you’ve ever had to do these tasks.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

“Garbage bear” is a term used to refer to bears who develop the practice of raiding garbage cans. Some bears follow established collection routes that can range for miles. Making filled garbage cans accessible to bears encourages them to enter yards and properties, putting them into closer proximity to the humans who live there. Reduce your risk—and discourage a bear from developing this behavior—by storing cans where bears cannot access them. Place the cans along roadways as close as possible to the time specified for pickup. 

Careful co-existence

Many of us live in the Upper Delaware River region partly for the opportunity to experience the abundant and amazing wildlife sharing the forests and waters of this majestic place.


Photo from Wikimedia Commons

This Eurasian watermilfoil is considered an invasive aquatic species in New York State. Its stems are usually three to 10 feet in length and can range from pale pink to reddish brown in color. Bright green feathery leaves are finely divided and occur in circles around the stem. Each leaf has 12 to 21 leaflet pairs. Native northern watermilfoil, which it can commonly be confused with, has five to 10 leaflet pairs.

Free webinar on aquatic invasive species

ONLINE/NY — The New York Sea Grant Watercraft Inspection educational webinar series starts January 17. The program features coastal science and aquatic invasive species (AIS) experts and will address issues associated with recreational boating and limiting the spread of  invasive species in New York’s ponds, rivers and lakes.


TRR photo by Scott Rando

This is an aerial image of Walker Lake in Shohola, PA, in early December. The ice is too thin to hold anyone. The lower right portion of the lake shows the inlet stream and the absence of ice in that area. There are three holes together near the center frame, which is likely a spring.

Got ice?

With New Years behind us, a lot of people are looking forward to getting involved in seasonal outdoor activities, including skiing and snowshoeing. By January, the ice fishing season has usually kicked off in most of the region; in fact, in some areas, it is a tradition to do some ice fishing on New Years Day.


Photo by Rebecca Siegel/Flickr

Intro to Snowshoeing

DINGMAN’S FERRY, PA — Get prepped for a walk in the snow-covered woods by learning the age-old skill of snowshoeing at the Bridge the Gap program at the Pocono Environmental Education Center (PEEC).


File image

UDC to host conservationist

NARROWSBURG, NY — The Upper Delaware Council (UDC) will host a presentation by Wayne Conservation District resource conservationist Keith Pierson on Erosion and Sedimentation Pollution at  7 p.m. on January 3, at the UDC office located at 211 Bridge Street. Election of officers for 2019 will also take place.


All copyrighted photos contributed by Wayne Laubscher

Male Rufous hummingbird

Hummingbirds are here? Now?

In the warmer months of the year, it’s common to see hummingbirds throughout the Upper Delaware River region, brightening our lives with their bejeweled beauty and entertaining us with their feisty behaviors around feeders.

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