Outdoors


TRR photo by Sandy Long

Tick populations are soaring throughout the Upper Delaware River region, and ticks that were once uncommon, such as the lone star tick depicted here, are increasing in number. According to the PA Department of Health, Pennsylvania has led the nation in confirmed cases of Lyme disease for three straight years. The black-legged deer tick is the species most likely to transmit Lyme disease and has been found in each of Pennsylvania’s 67 counties. Visit https://bit.ly/2HtmxTJ to learn more. Download the Pennsylvania Recreation and Park Society’s helpful informational brochure on ticks at https://bit.ly/2HC3nIL. The PA Lyme Resource Network offers additional information at www.palyme.org.
 

Tick time

Although I’d prefer not to be the bearer of bad news, there’s no avoiding the fact that it’s tick time in the Upper Delaware River region. My dogs have already had several, and I came home from a 30-minute photo ramble in Pike County recently with four blacklegged tick nymphs making their way up the legs of my pants.


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Opening Day

Opening Day. The words opening day mean different things to different people. For example if you’re a Yankees fan, it means opening day at the ball park. But if you are a trout fisherman, fly fisher, or otherwise, it means only one thing: winter is over, and it’s time to load the car and head to the river.


TRR photos by Scott Rando

Robins are considered by many to be the first sign of spring, as flocks of them arrive in the region. However, some robins are present all winter here, if they can find a reliable food source; leftover berries or fruit on bushes are favored.

Some of spring’s arrivals

It’s hard to think of the coming of spring as I write this, because it is still snowing outside. No, not the 15 inches of snow we got a few weeks ago, which, with the wind, caused widespread damage throughout the region. No, this is just a dusting of wet snow that promises to melt with warming afternoon temperatures.


File photo

Japanese knotweed, seen here flowering, is perhaps the most ubiquitous of the invasive species in the Upper Delaware region.
 

Funding available for invasives research

ARKVILLE, NY — In an effort to stop the spread of invasive species that threaten our region’s ecosystem, raise awareness about invasive species and encourage the public to participate in the study of invasives, the Catskill Regional Invasive Species Partnership (CRISP) is seeking projects to fund in 2018.


Contributed photo

Woodcock

Audubon trip to view woodcocks

YOUNGSVILLE, NY — There will be a  Sullivan Audubon Field Trip to see displaying woodcocks at 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 14. They’re also known as timberdoodles, night partridges, big-eyes, bogsuckers, woodbats, and mudbats. Whatever you call them, come out and help spot them.

4-H Hosts youth vet science series

LIBERTY, NY — Youth with an interest in veterinary science, between the ages of 13 and 18, can engage in a hands-on veterinary science educational opportunity this spring. Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County (CCESC) is offering a three-part 4-H Youth Development program series on Thursdays April 12, 19 and 26 from 6 to 7:30 p.m.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

Learn more about wood frogs and other amphibians at Lacawac Sanctuary in Lake Ariel, PA, during Vernal Visitation on April 14 from 3 to 5 p.m. East Stroudsburg University professor Dr. Thomas LaDuke will probe the waters of the sanctuary for amphibians. Also, In Search of Spring Migrants is scheduled for April 28 from 8 to 10 a.m., during which experts from the Northeast PA Audubon Society hike through the sanctuary seeking spring migrants. Call 570/689-9494 or email info@lacawac.org for more information. At the Pocono Environmental Education Center in Dingmans Ferry, PA, explore breeding pools during Salamanders, Frogs and More, slated for April 8 and 21 from 10 a.m. to 12 noon; or look for tiny tree frogs during the Spring Peeper Search on April 21 from 7:30 to 9 p.m.

Assisting amphibians

After seeming like it might never arrive in the Upper Delaware River region, spring has finally sprung. While walking in a forested area in Pike County, PA last week, I heard the unmistakable “quacking” calls of wood frogs emanating from a vernal pool. Soon these will be followed by the riotous “eeps” of spring peepers.

Trout season 2018

The 2018 trout season is now open in New York State (Pennsylvania will have to wait a bit longer, until April 14). As is normally the case, our local rivers are running a bit high and very cold. These conditions should continue for a while since there is rain in the forecast and some snow still melting off.

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