delaware river


 TRR photos by Scott Rando
This loon is a study of intricate patterning as it spreads its wings next to my kayak on Walker Lake in Shohola, PA in early May. Its red eyes stand out even though it was cloudy with intermittent rain.

Loons: just passing through

One May afternoon, I happened to be working in the yard when I thought I heard the mournful call of a loon. I was almost done with my work, and when I was finished, I headed down to Walker Lake with a pair of binoculars to see if I could find what had made that noise.


TRR photo by Amanda Reed

My view

I sat on a bench on my river bank remembering a childhood dream that one day I might live in a house on the Delaware River.


Photos provided by Tony Bonavist

A Hendrickson Mayfly

Another silent spring?

About three years ago, angling friends that fish Catskill rivers reported a decline in some traditional mayfly hatches. Of particular concern was the purported absence of sulphur mayflies, an eagerly awaited though somewhat-frustrating little fly.


 TRR photos by Sandy Long

Beaver are semi-aquatic mammals that weigh between 30 to 60 pounds and range in length from 20 to 25 inches with flat, textured, paddle-shaped tails approximately 10 to 15 inches long. The tails serve as rudders when swimming, store fat in winter, provide balance and act as a prop when the animal is cutting down trees. Beaver also use their tails to warn potential predators away with a loud slap on the surface of the water.

Beaver behavior

Did you know the beaver is New York State’s official mammal, or that it is North America’s largest rodent? I recently encountered the beaver depicted here and had the opportunity to observe it harvesting twigs from along an icy shoreline, then engaging in grooming activities.


TRR photos by Scott Rando

This is one of the bald eagle nests along the Delaware River. In it were three young that are three to four weeks old. Two of them were visible when this image was captured last May. An average clutch for a bald eagle nest is two offspring, and records show that the majority of young produced from nests on the Delaware River survive past fledge from year to year.

The state of the eagles

The start of a new year usually means it’s time to move on from the past year’s local government activities and early January re-organizational meetings. Also, there’s been drama to keep up with over the partial federal government shutdown and the uncertain State of the Union address in Washington, D.C.


TRR photo by Amanda Reed

A swan in the Big Eddy 

People have noticed a swan floating around on the river near the Narrowsburg Bridge lately. Though the feathered loner seems an unusual sight in the Catskills in January, it’s not, say conservation experts.

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