Blogs & Columns


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

Representing all age groups, the Ruiz family, from Livingston Manor, showed up in full force to participate in the seventh annual “RISE: Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” event held at the government center in Monticello.

It's not all fun and games

I’m not gonna lie: as many of you suspect, I have a pretty cool job. Whether I’m attending a concert under the stars, taking my seat at a sold-out performance of “Annie,” or photographing kids flying their kites in the great outdoors, more often than not, I’m having fun with Dharma the Wonder Dog along for the ride.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

Pennsylvania’s Department of Conservation and Natural Resources has identified trees as a top tool in addressing climate change. The agency is urging citizens to plant native tree species along streams to improve riparian buffers, as well as in backyards and community spaces. Riparian buffers are the trees, shrubs and grasses that serve as transitional zones from land to water. They act as filters for sediments and pollutants and help to keep them from reaching the water. Find helpful information in Common Trees of Pennsylvania (https://tinyurl.com/ya526lkf) or through the riparian buffer initiative (https://tinyurl.com/yd6n643c) or from TreeVitalize (https://tinyurl.com/y79amt9d). 

Trees please

The Upper Delaware River region experienced excessive damage to and loss of many trees during intense winter storms that delivered heavy snow and powerful winds during the final weeks of winter. Evidence of those impacts can still be seen in Pennsylvania’s Pike and Wayne counties, and in Sullivan County, New York.


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Relentless spring

Relentless spring, we are joyful in your persistence as you battled for your time on earth over dreaded winter. You arrived early, over a month ago. The arctic beast still had its claws in deep, refusing to yield. Still you marched on against the interminable Old Man Winter.


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

Thirteen year-old Carter Paterson, center, and his talented fellow members of the Young People’s Chorus of New York City performed everything from Broadway to Mozart with incredible style at Bethel Woods last weekend.

Like sands through the hourglass…

I’m almost afraid to say it, but it would appear that spring has sprung. Turns out that all we needed was a few consecutive days of sunshine, coupled with temps above freezing, to melt the mountains of snow.


TRR photos by Scott Rando

Two wood frogs are in amplexus; the male is above the female with his forelegs locked together. They will remain so coupled until the female deposits her eggs, usually on an under branch or other object, next to egg masses of other wood frogs. Color phases of wood frogs can be dark brown to a light tan, with the lighter colors seen during the summer when they are out of the water.

Hearable herps

April is usually the month when you can count on hearing the first frogs of spring. Sometimes, they start in late March, but this has been a colder spring than usual.


TRR photos by Kristin Barron

Snowdrops re-emerge

The search for spring

Spring is a magician. A sort of “now you see it, now you don’t” kind of swindler. My case in point: the diminutive snowdrop flowers that appeared in my lawn in fearless, full bloom on March 1 that then disappeared under the drifts of all that March snow we endured.


TRR photo by Jonathan Charles Fox

Last week, Town of Bethel Supervisor Dan Sturm went over details of the new dog park under construction in Smallwood, NY as Caroline Akt and others listened in.

Small-town life

I’m a product of the “baby-boomer” generation. Defined as “those born between 1946 and 1964,” the “boom” generation consists of some 72 million of us (www.cnn.com) sprawled across the nation.


TRR photo by Sandy Long

Tick populations are soaring throughout the Upper Delaware River region, and ticks that were once uncommon, such as the lone star tick depicted here, are increasing in number. According to the PA Department of Health, Pennsylvania has led the nation in confirmed cases of Lyme disease for three straight years. The black-legged deer tick is the species most likely to transmit Lyme disease and has been found in each of Pennsylvania’s 67 counties. Visit https://bit.ly/2HtmxTJ to learn more. Download the Pennsylvania Recreation and Park Society’s helpful informational brochure on ticks at https://bit.ly/2HC3nIL. The PA Lyme Resource Network offers additional information at www.palyme.org.
 

Tick time

Although I’d prefer not to be the bearer of bad news, there’s no avoiding the fact that it’s tick time in the Upper Delaware River region. My dogs have already had several, and I came home from a 30-minute photo ramble in Pike County recently with four blacklegged tick nymphs making their way up the legs of my pants.

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