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TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

DJ Adam Owens (and his gigantic head) was a hit with the crowd at the Western Hotel’s annual Halloween bash.

Who am I anyway?

That question, famously asked in the 1975 Broadway musical “A Chorus Line” often haunts me. “Am I my resumé? That is a picture of a person I don’t know.” I think that most of us, from time to time, experience an identity crisis of one sort or another, often brought on by having to play a variety of roles in life.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

As its name implies, the variable oakleaf caterpillar feeds on all species of oaks, with a preference for white oaks. It will also consume species such as beech, basswood, paper birch, American elm, and occasionally walnut, black birch and hawthorn.

A collection of caterpillars

Most of us would recognize the fuzzy black-and-brown-banded woolly bear caterpillar or the distinctive monarch caterpillar and its striking bands of yellow, black and white. But there are many caterpillars we might encounter in the Upper Delaware River region that are more challenging to identify.

Young rider

It is one of our warmer October days. Leaves are still falling. Butterflies are making their way around the plants on the deck. It is nice to be home early.


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

Callicoon’s Kazzrie Jaxen was among the many groovin’ to the music during Beverly Sterner’s dance party celebrating  16 years of the Upper Delaware Community Network (UD network).

It’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood

Well, it was anyhow. At the moment, it’s raining cats and dogs and what’s left of fall foliage is, well… falling. I did, however, spend the last week meandering through the mountains in search of leaf-peeping photo-ops and scored big time, although the explosions of color were at times difficult to find.


TRR photo by Scott Rando

The lower of these two sub-adult bald eagles is R27, a New York radio-tagged eagle captured two years prior. New York State is also experiencing issues concerning lead toxicity in bald eagles. A 22-year study where 300 bald eagles were screened for lead has shown that about 17% had high levels of lead, high enough to be lethal.
 

PA Game Commission: Bald eagle lead poisoning on the rise

It’s mid-January in a conifer forest with a few clearings within. On the ground, at the edge of one of the clearings, sits an adult bald eagle. It’s not by choice the eagle is sitting on the ground; a few days back it started to experience awkwardness in flight.

A chance at fall spawners

For anglers living in central and western New York, fall is the time to fish tributaries of the Finger Lakes and the Great Lakes. This is the time of year when runs a pacific salmon, brown trout and land-locked Atlantic salmon begin their spawning migrations.


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

Boys & Girls Club Senior Unit Director Barbi Neumann Marty was beaming during the social hour, making my job that much easier as I photographed the Farm-to-Table experience last weekend

Please, and thank you!

Such simple words that cost us nothing to say, and yet, they seem to be vanishing from our collective vocabulary. It’s not often that I use this column to rant, but every once in a while I do take advantage of the space the fine folks at The River Reporter grant me to discuss something other than puppet shows and bake sales.

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