Blogs & Columns


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

Bethel, NY artist Michael Randels has been restoring the Woodstock Festival monument every spring since 2002. “Winters are tough on it,” he says. “The frost takes its toll, and visitors jump all over it when they come to visit, which is cool with me. I’m glad they enjoy having their pictures taken with it.”

June is bustin’ out all over!

It should come as no surprise (IMHO) that my birthday is a national holiday, and now that it has passed, I can get down to business. If for some reason your cards and gifts got lost in the mail, feel free to forward them on to me c/o The River Reporter.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

The Pike County Training Center features several stormwater best management practices (BMPs). The vegetated diversion berm at right in this photo conveys runoff around the site rather than through it, minimizing erosion of soils and the amount of stormwater that needs to be managed on site. Other features include a wetland forebay and wet pond, which receive runoff from impervious surfaces, as well as infiltration berms, which trap pockets of water, allowing it to soak into the ground. The various elements are all part of the site’s “treatment train” of stormwater BMPs. 

BMPs are VIPs

When it comes to protecting water quality in the Upper Delaware River region, best management practices (BMPs) are very important practices.


TRR photo by Tony Bonavist

The Peekamoose Blue Hole

The 'Blue Hole' under siege

There is a magical place, high in the eastern Catskills, where crystalline waters flow to form the “Blue Hole.” It is part of the upper Rondout watershed in the Town of Denning and is fed by Rondout Creek, which flows along Peekamoose Road.


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

Artists Adrienne Butvinik, left, Ramona Jan and Joan Nicole were a colorful trio during a recent “pop-up” show at the Catskill Distilling Co. in Bethel, NY.

In the blink of an eye

I’m not sure if I’m clinically depressed, self obsessed, or simply mad as a hatter, but my mind never stops whirring, and it’s difficult getting to sleep these days. When attempting to explain how I feel to my shrink—or what friends I have left—I stutter and stammer, seeking the right words. “It’s an existential crisis,” I said to a confidant.

Power, pain, and psychopathy

In 2011, I submitted a joke to the public radio show “Prairie Home Companion” for inclusion in the annual “Joke Show,” and it got in! (A small claim to fame, perhaps, but I’ll take it.) Here it is:

“Knock knock!”

“Who’s there?”

“Bush and Cheney tortured.”

“Bush and Cheney tortured who?”


TRR photo by Scott Rando

This orphaned bear cub is being re-introduced to an existing family of cubs by PA Game Commission staff. It is hoped that the mother will accept the new cub as one of her own. It is unknown how the cub became orphaned in the first place.

Youngsters in trouble

Spring is looked upon as the renewal of life; in the wild, most animals are breeding, and many species have young walking along with parents or in the nest, in the case of birds. Newly born or hatched young are much more vulnerable than the adults, and nature typically provides some protection for these young.


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

Carlos Holden and Amber Schmidt are well cast in the SCDW production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” now playing at the Rivoli in South Fallsburg, NY.

A man for all seasons

I would never call myself fashionable. Sure, I look in the mirror before I leave the house—but I’m often at a loss as to what to wear and far more concerned with my mop of hair, grateful that it still sprouts from my head in unruly abundance.


TRR photos by Kristin Barron

Trailing arbutus

Thanksgiving in May

One of the lesser valued pursuits of spring is the annual cleaning out of the freezer.

This job clears the way for ice pops and ice cream during the summer months. And it is how it has come to be that I am roasting a turkey on this fine, mild spring day.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

A blaze of bright yellow along regional roadways at this time of year typically signals the presence of the cheerful flowers of coltsfoot. This sunny bloomer favors gravelly roadsides and waste places. Flowers precede the appearance of leaves thought to resemble a colt’s foot.

Harbingers of spring

Much to our collective relief, the local landscape is brightening with color as spring sweeps her painterly brush across the lackluster view we became accustomed to while wintry weather lingered a little too long.

May

I’ve always wished there was enough free time and adequate resources to take the month of May off and just go fishing. Most of us can’t do that, but we can fantasize.

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