Blogs & Columns

Dyed in the wool

Color delights us in nature, in fashion, food, design, and in its metaphorical and spiritual meanings. But the history of color is also a story of technological discovery, gruesome manufacturing processes (often involving urine, blood and dung), social and religious dictates, industrial espionage and trade wars. From British author Kassia St.


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

At first glance, it looked pretty bad, but most of the trunk fell to the side of the trunk.

Milk, bread and eggs

Yep—I’m making my list and checking it twice, because it looks like it’s gonna happen again. Just as New York and Pennsylvania begin to come back online, a second blizzard looms, threatening to complete a “onetwo punch” that none of us deserve. The past few days have been trying for many, but (as most of you know) I rarely complain.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

These tracks indicate the passage of a human and two dogs. But what is that curious arc appearing to the left of the first dog’s tracks? The human tracks are mine and the middle tracks, displaying a normal gait, were made by my dog Ziva. My new pup, Raven, has a waddling side-to-side swish. As her hind feet move forward, they swing outward, creating the crescent shape seen here. Domestic dogs provide good opportunities to hone your tracking skills.

Surviving the times

Severe weather events like the one that struck the Upper Delaware River region recently throw us suddenly out of our normal routines. Priorities shift to survival activities like securing adequate shelter, clean water and ample nourishment.

Reflections

It’s early March, soft snow falling, a fire in the wood stove. Molly is snoring at the hearth. It’s been an abnormally cold winter here in the Catskills, with below zero nights and brisk, windy days. There is a lot of snow too, much more than normal.


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Fleeing February

It was getting to be too much for us. Even the thought of February made me shudder back in December. So it was against frugality we made plans for a week in Costa Rica again. It was something to look forward to in the darkest, coldest months.


Perched high above the crowd at Bar 360 inside the casino at Resorts World Catskills, the Somerville Brothers played with their band as an appreciative crowd hollered in approval last Friday night.

I've fallen and I can't get up

Remember those words? I sure do, and they’ve come back to haunt me. The expression is so ingrained in pop culture that it’s even a listing in Wikipedia: “a famous catchphrase of the late 1980s based upon a line from a U.S.-based television commercial.” Think Clara Peller’s “Where’s the beef?” but with a broken hip.


TRR photo by Jane Bollinger

The brown color patterns of ruffed grouse make them inconspicuous in their forest habitat and helps keep them from being detected by predators. Some good news has come from the PGC study; if a grouse comes into contact with West Nile virus and survives, it then develops antibodies which prevents them from contracting the disease in the future.

Trouble for the ruffed grouse in PA

Hunters in PA have always looked forward to going afield with a dog and pursuing the elusive ruffed grouse. You can hunt this species without a dog, but it is a lot more difficult, as these well camouflaged birds flush out of cover and provide the briefest of targets before they rapidly disappear in forest cover.

Look up

Winter nights are understandably cold, sometimes even bitter cold. Yet on those bitter-cold nights when the sky is clear, the universe opens up to us in its glory.


Photos by Sierra Gaglione

There really was standing room only for both of Jonathan Fox’s performances at the Delaware Valley Arts Association’s Salon Series in Narrowsburg, NY last weekend.

Standing room only

Those three words, and the accompanying abbreviation (SRO) are what every performer wants to see posted outside the theatre prior to a performance, even though they might jangle one’s nerves on opening night.


Photos courtesy of PA Dept. of Agriculture

Almost clownish in appearance, the spotted lanternfly is no laughing matter. This exotic insect poses a major threat to many of our region’s native plant species and hardwood forests. Adults are approximately 1 inch long and one-half inch wide at rest.

Meeting to target spotted lanternfly

As noted in our news story of February 8, the latest exotic insect invader to threaten our native plant species is the spotted lanternfly (SLF). Despite its eye-catching appearance, this is a seriously bad bug that was first discovered in Berks County, PA in 2014 and has expanded to affect approximately 3,000 square miles by the end of 2017.

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