Blogs & Columns


TRR photos by Sandy Long

This wood frog was resting under the leaf litter in my yard, where it will eventually overwinter. Due to their light tan coloration, wood frogs are well camouflaged by fallen foliage. An easily identifiable characteristic is the dark mask that stretches from the frog’s eye to just behind its eardrum.

Lurking in the leaf litter

While raking leaves in my yard recently, one suddenly leapt away from me. Similar in color to the foliage on the ground, the leaper turned out to be a wood frog, who probably didn’t appreciate my disruption. The truth is, most animals prefer their habitats to be ungroomed, and as unaltered from their natural state as possible.


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

A spooky hayride was a hit at Barryville’s Pumpkin Fest last weekend. 

Family affair

Autumn is an ideal time for family get-togethers, apple picking and all things fall. There were plenty of family affairs going on throughout the Upper Delaware River region over the last few days, and as I leashed the pup and meandered the countryside in search of fall foliage to photograph, I managed to soak up some local flavor along the way.


TRR photos by Scott Rando

This monarch was caught by the camera in mid-flight after stopping for a rest as it checked out some goldenrod. This individual, like many others of its species, is on its way south to Mexico. Migration counts are still ongoing at hawk-counting sites, but the numbers are above average compared to the last three years.

Still time for fall butterflies

For those readers that have been following the monarch butterflies through the summer, you have probably been encouraged by the number of monarchs seen compared to the previous few years. In the August 16 issue, I did a River Talk column on the increase in monarch sightings, and that trend seems to have continued.

The Delaware in October

This is one of my favorite months to fly fish the Delaware River and its branches. The mountains are lit up with color, and it is very pleasant time to spend a day in the outdoors. The autumn is also a time when many outdoorsmen are torn among multiple activities, so our rivers have little pressure.


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

In anticipation of stunning fall foliage, I’ve set out chairs for Dharma and me, with the intent of taking a moment or two to chill a little, before the inevitable big chill to come.

Frost on the pumpkin

I’m feeling conflicted. On one hand, I love this time of year and the multitude of harvest festivals, hay rides and haunted houses celebrating the bounty of life-in-the-country good times. On the other hand, I’m dreading winter, knowing there will be days of feeling isolated and cut off from the outside world.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

Finding fall foliage

Fall foliage season in the state of Pennsylvania is a spectacular thing to experience. With more than 17 million acres of forested land throughout the state, there are abundant opportunities to enjoy the trees, brush, berries and vines that contribute to this deeply satisfying sensory treasure.


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

The Narrowsburg Honey Bee Fest parade might have been smaller this year, but was no less enthusiastic.

Déjà vu

The term “déjà vu” is French and literally means “already seen.” Those who have experienced the feeling (up to 70% of the population) describe it as “an overwhelming sense of familiarity” and (according to www.howstuffworks.com), the phenomenon is “rather complex.” Swiss scholar Arthur Funkhouser sugges

Mary's wallet

My headlights shone on something glittering in the blackness of morning as I pulled into my parking space under the tree. These days the station is dark for the early trains with the exception of some overhead lamps on the platform.


TRR photos by Scott Rando

This close-flying broad-winged hawk allowed us to get a good look. Broad-winged hawks are smaller than red-tailed hawks; they also feed on small mammals. In flight, the barred tails are very evident as well as the dark fringe on the trailing edges of the wings.

The flight of the broad-winged hawks

If you have been in or near the woods during this past summer, you may have heard a high-pitched single-note whistle. It is piercing and carries a fairly long distance, even through the forest. Occasionally, you may have spotted a stubby-winged hawk, appearing somewhat like a miniature red-tailed hawk, sounding this call.

Pages

 

Privacy Policy & Terms of Use

Copyright 2018 Stuart Communications, Inc.

PO Box 150, 93 Erie Avenue

Narrowsburg NY 12764

(845) 252-7414

All Rights Reserved