Bears


Photo provided by Scott Rando

This is a bear cub from one of last year’s den visits. When they first emerge from the den in April, they weigh from four to six pounds, but grow close to 100 pounds as a yearling. As the latter part of March approaches, there should be more activity visible from the PGC bear-cam.

The bears’ live debut

Okay, so the groundhog may have lied, or, at least, led us slightly astray regarding the end of winter. It seems that March came in like a lion with some moderate, ice-laden storms followed by cold days with lows in the single digits.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

“Garbage bear” is a term used to refer to bears who develop the practice of raiding garbage cans. Some bears follow established collection routes that can range for miles. Making filled garbage cans accessible to bears encourages them to enter yards and properties, putting them into closer proximity to the humans who live there. Reduce your risk—and discourage a bear from developing this behavior—by storing cans where bears cannot access them. Place the cans along roadways as close as possible to the time specified for pickup. 

Careful co-existence

Many of us live in the Upper Delaware River region partly for the opportunity to experience the abundant and amazing wildlife sharing the forests and waters of this majestic place.


TRR photos by Scott Rando

This bear has been caught red-pawed, foraging in a garbage can in Shohola, PA. Bears especially like communities where several homes are in close proximity of each other; it’s easier to “make the rounds” on garbage collection day. Try to wait and put out garbage on the day of pick-up to keep from getting an unwelcome visit.

Christmas bears

Early last week, a neighbor complained to me that a bear had carried her garbage from the trashcan to the edge of her yard.


TRR photos by Scott Rando

This female with her two cubs was seen about two to three weeks after they emerged from their den. These cubs will grow rapidly; in a year, they may be close to 100 pounds. The female is also wearing a radio collar. The PA Game Commission uses the collars to keep track of the number and health of cubs produced each year from selected dens.

Bears on the wild side

Bears on the wild side

 

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